Dating other graduate students

Due to the many factors such as Latter-day Saint beliefs and University encouragement, courtship and marriage are very important aspects of BYU's social scene.

Those same religious beliefs have also resulted in an unwelcome atmosphere for students who are not heterosexual and policies that explicitly ban homosexual relationships.

Leaders encourage students and faculty to help fulfill the goal by following the teachings of their religion, adhering to the school's honor code, and serving others with the knowledge they gain while attending.

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Contrastingly, according to research done by professors at BYU in their study titled "A Survey of Dating and Marriage at BYU," 88% of BYU students reported going on at least one date a month.

Even more, 15% of the student population reported going on six or more dates each month.

In the past, students and faculty have expressed dissatisfaction with this nickname, as it sometimes gives students the idea that university authorities are always divinely inspired and never to be contradicted.

Leaders of the school, however, acknowledge that the nickname represents more a goal that the university strives for, and not its current state of being.

This mentality is common on BYU's campus, causing many stereotypes and countless jokes.

As a university, BYU is extremely supportive of marriage.

According to a study done by BYU professors, students at BYU feel marriage is a high priority.

More specifically, 95% of BYU students rank "marrying in the temple" as a "very important" goal, second only to "a close personal relationship with God".

For example, The Daily Universe—the student run newspaper at BYU—publishes a Bridal Guide each summer.

Even the course selection at BYU reflects an emphasis on marriage.

Norval Glenn and Elizabeth Marquardt studied the "dating and mating" habits of typical college students in their study "Hooking Up, Hanging Out, and Hoping for Mr.

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